C13P35 – No more stories – MOKO Press presents: LeyLines, a Fantasy Adventure Comic by Robin Childs Skip to content
Follow

C13P35 – No more stories

C13P35 – No more stories published on 8 Comments on C13P35 – No more stories

Forget indigestion…maybe this is food poisoning?

Also, Kali seriously took what Mizha said regarding focus to heart.  That, and she’s still not willing to extend this trickster a ton of trust.  After all, he might just be a big faker.

I’ve been getting multiple reports of weird glitches in comments and delays in comments showing up.  If this has happened to you, I’m sorry for the inconvience and general oddness.  The issues started with the newest WordPress update and Cache plugin update.  I have turned off the Cache plugin to see if that fixes the issues.  If the problems stop, I’ll look into different plugins to keep the site speed up without sacrificing the usability.  If you do have a problem, please let me know.  If comments aren’t working for you, there’s always Twitter, Facebook, or the Contact Me page.

Speaking of Twitter, I received a lovely gift there today from @KaylaOfAurcana.

Thank you so much!  Kayla creates the comic City of Aurcana.  Paris is a young human doctor on a world overtaken by aliens.  As a strange disease that targets half-human/half-alien hybrids starts to spread, Cash, one of the half breeds, reaches out to Paris to save his infected best friend.

Last week I was hired as a tutor for a young creative local interested in comics.  I’ll be starting in June, which will be very exciting.  It also means that I’m definitely going to run that fan-work contest I was debating last week. I’ll put together a formal announcement and figure out some rules by the end of this week in lieu of a Q&A comic on Friday.  (Speaking of, if you’ve missed any of those, they are all collected here.)

It will be interesting to work one-on-one with a student rather than in groups.  Most of the lesson plans I have are developed for larger amounts of kids, complete with group activities.  Some I should be able to adapt — the field-trip to a local part to do some perspective drawing — but other things, like students striking a pose for the rest of the group to sketch, I’ll need to find other approaches for.  Maybe I could turn it into a make-your-own-reference exercise?  Set up the computer camera, let them make whatever poses they want, and then have them draw from the reference they made?

I’ll have to get creative with it.  Should be fun!

8 Comments

Children visit this site. Moderate your language accordingly.

I think that Dream Eater is trying to warn them that the ignorance that was causing him pain earlier is about to transform him into something he cannot control. While not explicitly telling them that due to time constraints/lack of thinking that they can change anything. He does after all seem to be changing fast.

Is Kali’s perception of Dream Eater causing him to change? Or is he being hit hard by the general perception of him that most people believe? If Kali’s perception is harming/transforming Dream Eater then I would recommend Zhiro telling Kali to be more open minded/stop thinking so negatively of Dream Eater. That or flee back to reality.

From what I understand of this comic, people’s perception towards a God/Goddess (like Dream Eater), whether they are the followers of that God/Goddess or not, have an impact on said God/Goddess. Based on how Vision’s followers perceive Dream Eater I would not be surprised if he has some problems maintaining who he really is.

I really like the concept of believing something can make it true and trying to hold on to oneself when one’s true nature is the opposite of what people believe it to be. I would enjoy seeing a Dream Eater and flutterbuts before people had misconceptions about him; I could see Dream Eater being the wise elder that teaches you knowledge but has fun confusing you occasionally too.

Have to say I enjoy your comic and I look forward to possibly participating in the fan contest.

Tales are still told, in places where Visionary ears cannot listen, of wizened old wanderers with wicked cackles and twinkling eyes. Of mercurial youths that know more than anyone of their age should. Of cranky hermits hidden on mountain tops that trade riddles for questions. Of strange creatures in the mountain woods that mimic human voices to jeer and tempt travelers off the well-beaten path. Yet a stout heart, clever mind, and determined will often came out of encounters with these figures having gained more than was lost…at least, in experience. Worldly possessions not guaranteed.

I hate to be a total weirdo, but when did this belief thing start applying only to supernatural beings? I’m pretty sure it’s applied to me in the past. I hope I’m not a supernatural being. Anyway, story goes like this:
When I was a kid, our family would move around a fair deal, new town, new school, etc. This wasn’t such a big deal for my sister, who’d make friends almost instantly, but I’d be the weird new kid for quite a while. Not wanting to make waves, I’d keep my head down and get the reputation as a giant nerd.
Unfortunately, nerds are prime bullying material, and it wouldn’t be long before someone decided to rough me up a little. I’d respond – violently. Soon enough, the rumor would be passed around that the new kid was a violent psychopath.
After a while of taunts and jeering with no response, the only people who’d still start trouble would be those kids who were always up to no good. When everyone realized I was getting in fights with the people they’d always hated, there would be a new rumor. New kid is a secret badass, a hero.
Unfortunately for my new would-be friends, there’s a bitter aftertaste in knowing that you are sought out, forgiven, mainly because you won. If the local “talent” had succeeded in beating me up, they would themselves have been cheered for ousting the outsider. Instead I’d seek the company of those who didn’t care about the social scene. Outsiders, outcasts, the simply studious. in time, local bullies would pick on others, there’s no shortage of victims, and a new rumor would arise. That so-called badass new kid is just a wimpy nerd. This time, it’d usually stick.
So which was I? Victim, perpetrator, hero? I don’t know now, didn’t know then. You’d think the answer would be simple, immutable, even if it was simply “some of each,” but I remember the certainty that I’d be told what I was, week by week, and that it depended, not on what I did, but on what other people thought about what I did. Dreameater can be changed by peoples opinions? Ha, we all can.

I agree completely. A lot of my work revolves around the themes that our image of self is shaped by the stories people tell about us. It might be the most obvious in LeyLines for Dream Eater, but I would argue that every character has been heavily impacted by the expectations and narratives of others.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Primary Sidebar